Objects with X-ray plates. 1984-1987

The kids, 1985

The kids, 1985
Index, 1985

Index, 1985
Anima, 1985

Anima, 1985
Doubts, 1985

Doubts, 1985
Pat Binder arrived at the use of x-rays by coincidence. Upon finishing her studies in painting, she taught art. This was necessary in order to live and allowed her time to distance herself from the criteria of her own artistic education, completed under the military dictatorship. It seemed incomprehensible to her how one could be removed from reality for years, concerned only with the problems of paintstrokes, of composition and of color, while elsewhere in the country murder was committed and neighbors disappeared forever. Such an isolated world of painting left behind a horrible feeling of unbelievable ignorance. Because of her ensuing mistrust of painterly means, she sought other, more insistent ways of expression with which the events could be recorded more directly. In this decision, she swam against the »mainstream«, for in the middle of the 80's the »hunger for paintings« was insatiable in the international art scene and in Argentina.

While the monotype was being used in classes, students and teacher found the smooth surface of x-rays to be an inexpensive substitute for the metal plates normally used as a printing underlay. Pat Binder soon came to be known for the formal intensity of the light-transmissive black and white images depicting the hidden inner regions of man. For her, the skeleton of x-rayed bodies attained the meaning of an existential character of far-reaching symbolism. According to the context in which it was placed, and in combination with other elements in her assemblages, the possibilities of association varied within a relatively limited spectrum. For the most part, it deals with the martyred creature, the appearance of transparent bodies from the void into which they had disappeared without a trace; with an imprisonment or a macabre game, rich in associations, with single extremities as a process of fragile constructions. Blurry projections of single images on the wall behind them increase the drama and allow an excessive, immaterial layer of light and shadow to materialize. Time and again she uses meditative objects to reflect on her own sensitivities.

From: Gerhard Haupt, Resistance-images
In: Pat Binder: Zapping. Institut für Auslandsbeziehungen, Berlin 1996

Help, 1985

Help, 1985
 
Neighbours, 1985

Neighbours, 1985
Missing, 1985

Missing, 1985
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